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111 (iiil\ iiL^.: ioii on which you 
want to be reminded of your un- 
derlhings is when you are in'the 
knit underwear department of one of the 
great shops. The name "Merode" on 
the garment offered you is just a verifica- 
tion of the gentleness of texture, the se- 
curity of tailoring, and the daintiness of 
needlework that your critical eye will 
already have detected. "Merode", for 
years, has made its whole duty that of 
keeping the human body comfortahlc 
and clean. That is why there are so 
many women who prefer it, and so many 
styles and textures of "Merode" to grat- 
ify their preference. 



' 



'"-^^ 




HAND- 
TAILORED 






KNIT 
UNDERWEAR 



iltcd and hand-tailored at Harvard Mills, in the Town of Wakefield, Mass. 
' 'idred employee partners of the firm of Winship, Doit & Co., 






GRADUATION EXERCISES 

WAKEFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1925 




HIGH SCHOOL 

THURSDAY, JUNE TWENTY - FIFTH 
EIGHT O'CLOCK 



r ogram 



Overture and March 

Chorus — Over the Foaming Wave Wilson 

Essay — Salutatory - The Rythm of Life 

HELEN SARAH RAMSDELL 

Chorus — Bedouin Lx)ve Song Pinsuti 

Recitation — The Reign of Law Woodrow Wilson 

Fourth of July Address at Washington's Tomb 
harry GOODWIN TOUNGE, Jr. 



Recitation 



The Sign of the Cross 

EMILY WELLS SMITH 



Solo - Friend O'Mine 

RONALD HILL SHERMAN 



Wilson Barrett 



Weatherly 



Eugene Field 
Manney 



Essay — Honor Part — Libraries 

HELEN ADELINE CLOTHEY 

Recitation — Baked Beans and Culture 

LEONARD WILTON JOLL 

Chorus — Shout Aloud in Triumph 

Recitation — Silence Edgar Lee Masters 

VIRGINIA LOUISE ULRICI 

Oration — Valedictory — Wayside Gold 

LORES WILLIAM McCLOSKEY 

Presentation of Diplomas Leo A. Rogers 

Member of School Committee 

Class Song 

Orchestra 



CLASS MOTTO 
"NEITHER TO SEEK NOR TO DESPISE HONOR" 



Class Song 



Oh dear old Wakefield High School, 
The theme of all our lays, 

We are leaving you tonight for 
The work of future days. 

Throughout our course of study, 
In this dear place of ours. 

We've enjoyed untold pleasures, 
Through all the blissful hours. 

In the days which are to follow. 
With mingled joys and sighs. 

We'll remember our dear teachers 
As helpful in our lives. 

Now that our work is over. 
We bid you a fond good-by, 

And we carry pleasant mem'ries 
From you, dear Wakefield High. 



BERTHA GERSINOVITCH 

Music by LOUIS AMIRO 



GRADUATES 



CLASS OF 1925 



CLASSICAL COURSE 

Norman P. Arnold Lores William McCloskey 

Margaret L. Atwell Arthur E. Newcomb, Jr. 

Leilia Fletcher Barstow John Beebe North 

Celia Anne Burwen Doris Emily Perkins 

Theresa Julia Collins Pauline Mathilda Peterson 

Doris Duley Helen Sarah Ramsdell 

Bertha Gersinovitch Eldon Randall 

David Guarnaccia Virginia Louise Ulrici 

Martha Katherine Jakeman Dorcas L. Woodbury 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE 
Myrton Parker Finney Rudolph E. Peterson 

James William Harper Joseph Sardella 

Alvah Elden Perkins Harry Goodwin Tounge, Jr 

ENGLISH COURSE 

Kenneth Lawrence Hunt 
Leonard Wilton Joll 
Myer Miller 

James Joseph McTeague 
Marjorie Roma Palmer 
Norma E. Perkins 



Ruth Beatrice Ames 
Louis Jerome Amiro 
Dorothy Marie Bauer 
Norman Atwell Bayrd 
Christine Fairbanks Crabiel 
Louise Eckart Davidson 



Edith May Dowling 
Emory N. Eaton 
William Byron Feindel, Jr. 
Katherine M. Gerry 
Lloyd Frederick Gilchrist 
Edythe Bailey Grant 



lola Louise Samuels 
S. Morton Sherman 
Emily Wells Smith 
Catherine Marie Sullivan 
Mina Tingley 
Clyde Leroy Tyler 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS COURSE 

Irma Frances Foster Lois Estelle Parks 

Eleanor K. Winkler 
COMMERCIAL COURSE 

Margaret Nancy Magee 



Ivy Alderson 
Delia E. Astle 
Ruth E. Bennett 
Agnes Elizabeth Burke 
Helen Adeline Clothey 
Alden Crosby Crocker 
Arlene May Davis 
Elery James Dewing 
Dorothy Elizabeth Dinan 
Loretta Gertrude Dulong 
Ralph Lawrence Edmands 
Vito Fazio 

Ralph Smith Flannigan 
Eva Gertrude Gates 
Agnes Josephine Grady 
Evelyn Mary Graham 
Mary Margaret Granfield 
Ruth Avery Hamden 
Helen Olive Hatch 
Thomas Joseph Hennessey 
William Patrick Hurton 
Henry Hugh Lishman 
Paul Walton Madden 



Mae F. Maroney 
George Winston Moulton 
Maurice Hugh O'Connell 
Stanley Richard Peterson 
Evelyn Margaret Reynolds 
Fred Paul Rich 
Mabelle Elliot Richardson 
Esther Elizabeth Roach 
Violet Mabel Savage 
Ronald Hill Sherman 
Christine J. Smith 
Eunice K. Smith 
Henry Paul Storti 
Marion Germaine Surrette 
Katherine Frances Talbot 
Ralph Leonard Thresher 
Maurice Leo Walsh 
Thomas Francis Walsh 
Mary Alice White 
Francis Walter Whitehead 
Aletha Bernice Whitney 
Gladys Whitney 



PRINTED BY WAKEFIELD SCHOOLS PRESS 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/wakefieldhighsch1925unse 



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THE YEAR BOOK 




WAKEFIELD HIGH SCHOOL, WAKEFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE YEAR BOOK 



©a (iHiss ^Itsahetl] ^vnntts ^Ingram, ivho has 
tnspu'fit in its c^vcatcr ainlntions nuh Hglicr ii»cals, 
(ur, the rhiss nf 1925, affccttmmtrlu brbicatc this 
hook. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



^acultg 



T I-I E YEAR BOOK 







THE YEAR BOOK 



(Sfjiculty 



WILLARD B. ATWELL Superintendent 

CHARLES J. PETERSON Principal 

ROL AN D H . KINDER Sub-Master 

EL I ZAB ETH F. I NG RA M English 

RAYMOND S. DOWER Bookkeeping, Economics 

CHARLES R. THIBADEAU Mathematics 

MARGARET A. RYAN Latin 

ETHEL G. REED English 

A. IRENE GODDARD French 

ALFRED E. PREBLE Chemistry 

HELEN F. G I LMORE Dean of Girls 

M. ALICE RYAN Stenography 

ARTHUR A. FULTON Civics 

MILDRED SULLIVAN English, Mathematics 

LILLIAN HURLEY English 

ALICE E. DONOVAN Bookkeeping 

HELEN B. CROCKER Mathematics 

K OLIVE HIRST English 

HARRIET F. HAYWARD Latin 

ISABEL M. HIRST Drawing 

HELEN SHEEHAN Elementary Science 

DONALD WHITE Horticulture 

RUTH F. HIATT Stenography 

R. EDGAR FISHER History 

HARRIET MASON French 

CHLOE K. COUSENS English, French 

ELVIRA C. COSMAN History 

MILDRED JONES Domestic Science 

ANNE H. M ESERVE Domestic Science 

DOROTH Y K. KOH L Librarian 

JOSEPH H. FANCK Mechanical Drawing 

CHARLES H. BEMIS, JR Physical Training 

ELEANOR H. BLAIKIE Physical Training 

LOUIS P. MARCHE Manual Training 

ERNEST M. MONROE Military Instructor 

RUTH F. B UTLER Office A ssistant 



THE YEAR 



BOOK 




fear ^ook ^taff 

h ditor-in-chiel A RTl 1 U R N EWCOM B, J R 

A ssociate Editors DO R I S D U L H Y , EMILY S M 1 T M 

Business Manager HARRY TOU NG E 

Asst. Business Manager BERTHA GERSINOVI'ICH 

Social Editors X'IRGINIA ULRICI, HELEN CLOTl lEY 

Athletic Editors EDYTHE GRANT, CLYDE TYLER 

Literary Editor HELEN RAMSDELL 

Joke Editors LO U 1 S A M 1 RO. M Y E R MILLER 

Battalion Editor MYRTON EINNEY 

Sta/J Artist PAULINE PETERSON 

Picture Committee WILLIAM FEINDEL, FRED RICH, LOUISE DAVIDSON. 

RUTH HARNDEN 

I- acuity Advisers , MISS K. OLIVE HIRST, MISS HELEN CROCKER, 

MISS RUTH IIIATL 



THE YEAR BOOK 




3ENI0R3 

^^^ 



THE YEAR BOOK 



ma 



tcers 



President LORES McCLOSKEY 

Vice President EMILY SM I TH 

Secretary MAE MARONEY 

Treasurer EUNICE SMITH 



THE YEAR BOOK 



LORES McCLOSKHY, President "Doc"' 

Harvard 
Somerville High (1, 2). Dramatic Club (3). Debating Club (3, 4). President De- 
bating Club (4). "Heirs-at-Law" (3). "Peddler-of-Hearts" (3). "Charm School" (4). 
Reporter for "Daily Item" (4). Stamp Club (4). 

"Earth sounds my wisdom 
And high heaven my fame." 




EMILY SMITH. Vice-President. "Em" 

Leland Powers' School of Expression 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio, High (1). Dramatic Club (3,4V "Heirs-at-Law" (3). "W" tor 

tags (3,4). Sponsor Co. B Prize Drill (3). Booster Staff (3). Editor-in-chief (4). Class 

Basket-ball (3). Prom. Committee (3,4). "Charm School" (4). Reception Committte 

(4). Reporter for "Daily Item" (4). Traffic Squad (3,4). Year Book (4). 

"Such a personality and such a smilutg face, 
Is a rare combination, evev in our race." 




MAE MARONEY, Secretary "June" 

Business 
Student Council (3). "Charm School" (4). Prom. Committee (4). Reception 
Committee (4). 

"/ have more than one use for my eyes." 




EUNICE SMITH. Treasurer 
Boston University 
Vice-President (3). "Peddler of Hearts" (3). "Charm School' 
cil (4). Prom. Committee (3,4). Reception Committee (4). 

"A form so fairy like and gay. 
To haunt, to startle, and way-lay." 



"Sfniitie" 



(4). Student Coun- 




THE YEAR BOOK 




Commercial Club (4). 



IVY ALDI-RSON 
Undecided 

"Feet that run on wtllina errands' 



RUTH A MRS 
Salem Nf)rmal 

"A modesi hlnsh she wore, 
Nol formed by art." ■ 



"Scatty" 



'Rufus" 




LOUIS AMIRC) 
College Undecided 
Orchestra (4). "Charm School" (4). Track (4). >'ear Book (4). 

"Thn lad can ralllc music . f.o for loiitiucs Ihal arc dead. 

Ills Ihouiibts arc on bis danciiifi keys, instead oj m bis bead.' 



"Tim" 




NORMAN ARNOLD 
P. G. 
Prom. Committee (3,4). Uootball (4). Basketball Mgr. (4). 

"Ob words bave win<j.s, but fly not where we would!' 



"Bomb' 




DLLLA ASTl.n 
Undecideil 

"A big smile for a small person." 



"D" 



THE YEAR BOOK 



MARGAIU-r ATWF.I.L 
Cambridge Haskell School 
Dramatic Club (3). "lieirs-at-1 aw" (j). Class Basketball (3). 

"A ready smile, an able brain, a mighty fine i^irl to call a friend." 



"Mis' 




I.niIJA BARSTOW 
Radcliffe 

"Thought works in silence." 




Glee Club. 



DOROTHY BAUER 
Salem Normal 

"She finds the pleasure in study. 
That most of us find in play" 



"Dot 




NO R.MAN BAYRD 



Battalion (4). Track (4). 



7 try to hurry hut I can't." 



'ffot-foof 




RUTI^ BENNETT 
Business 



'My heart leaps up when I behold a man." 



" Ruthie" 




THE YEAR BOOK 




mm^- 




AGNES BURKE 
Undecided 

"So quietly she moves, one scarcely knows she is about.' 



CEUA BU RIVEN 
Salem Normal 
Treasurer (1). "F^eddler of Hearts" (3). "Charm School" (4). 

"Tis true that she is much inclined 
To chin and talk with all mankind." 



Traffic Squad (3,4). 



HELEN CLOTHEY 
B. U. 
Prom. Committee (4). Year Book (4). 

"Her manner all who saw admired, 
Courteous, gentle and retired." 



"Ig" 



"C" 



■TilUe- 




CHRISTINE CRABIEL 
School for Interior Decoration 
Charm School (4). Orchestra (4). 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low, 
An excellent thing m woman." 



"Chris' 




LOUISE DAVIDSON "Bo^o" 

Burdett 
Dramatic Club (3,4). Glee Club (3). Traffic Squad (4). Prom. Committee (3). 
Reception Committee (4). 

"It's nice to he natural 
When you're naturally nice." 



THE YEAR 



BOOK 



ARLENE DAVIS 
Business School 
Glee Club (3). Student Council (3). Commercial Club (4). 

"Men are mere atoms." 



'Jennie 




ELERY DEWING 
Business 

"/ may be from the country 

But oh boy, I'm far from green!" 



"Dewey" 




Class Basket-ball. 



DO ROT/ 1 y DIN AN 
Business 

"It's the little things thai count— freckles!" 



"Dof 




EDITH DOW LING 
Simmons 
Secretary (2). Student Council (3i. Booster Staff (4). 
From Committee (3,4). 

"She's pretty to ivalk with 

And witty to talk with 

And pleasant, too, to think on." 



"Ede" 

"Charm School" (4) 




DORIS DULEY "ly 

Radcliffe 
Vice-President (2). Student Council (3). Booster Staff (3,4). Wrote play pro- 
duced in Assembly (3). "Peddler of Hearts" (3). Year Book (4). Basketball Mgr. (4). 
Reception Committee (4). Pres. of Debating Club (4). Reporter for "Daily item" (4), 
"Doris our Doris, our brown eyed laughing pal! 
With fun she's bubbling over, her spirits you can't quell." 




THE YEAR BOOK 




Football (4). 



ALDEN CROCK BR 
B. U. 

"An ounce of wit is ivorth a pound of sorrow.' 



LORHTTA DULONG 

Business 

"Better he small ai'J sbiiie 

Than be great and cast a shadow.' 



' l.innev" 



•Do" 




E.MORY EATON 
Undecided 
I'ootbail (4). Capt. in Battalion (4). 

"A fine volley of words, geiitleiiieii, and quickly shot off.' 



■Bug- 




RALPH EDMONDS 
Business 
Cross Country (4). Debating Club (4). Track (4). 

"Uncertain as to women." 




VI TO EA/.IO 
Business 

"He isn't much in a croted, but when you get him alone 



'Ve" 



THE YEAR BOOK 



WILLIAM F HINDI-: I. 
Wentvvorth Institute 



Debating Club (4). 



"Our little H'lllii' s.it 111 tl.H' ball 
Our little Willie took a yjeat jail 
All the king's hunes. and t.ll the kiiig\ men 
Couldn't put li'illie's heart iogetl:er again." 




AIYRTON F/NNHY -Myrf 

P. G. 
Football (2,3). Capt. (4). Basketball (3, 4*. President (3). Traffic Squad (3, 4) 
Major of Battalion (4). Booster StatT (3,4). ^'ear Book (4). 

"Ay, every inch a man." 



Baseball (3,4). 



RALPH L LAN NIC, A hi 
Business 

"Woman is fickle". 



'Flann' 




Booster Staff (3,4). 



IRAL'i FOSTER 
Undecided 
"Charm School" (4). 

"Laugh lehrii you are tickled, 

And laugh once in aicbile. anyicay. 



"Spii 




EVA GATES 

Business School 

"Constant as the northern star," 



"Eve" 




THE YEAR 



BOOK 




BERTHA GERSINOVITCH "Gus" 

Sargent 
Basketball (3,4). Glee Club (3). Debating Club (4). Dramatic Club (3). Boos- 
ter Staff (4). Year Book (4). "W (2,3,4). 

She IS witty, she is bright, she ivill make her mark all right. 




LLOYD GILCHRIST 

U. of N. H. 
Cross-Country (1). Dean Academy (3). Football (4). 

"And the cave-man leaped from his cave one night. 



'Spiingo" 




AGNES GRADY 
Business College 
Commercial Club (4). 

"What sweet delight a quiet life affords." 



Commercial Club (4). 



MARY GRAN FIELD 
Business 

'We meet thee like a pleasant thought." 



"H attic" 



"Smid" 




EDYTHE GRANT "Ede" 

LI n decided 
President (1). Capt. Basketball (3,4). Clee Club (2,3,4). "Peddler of Hearts' 
(3). Traffic Squad (3,4). Chr. Student Council (4). "W" for tags (1,2,3,4). Treas- 
urer Dramatic Club (3). Prom Committee (3). 

"Now Edythe loves all kinds of sport 
For she is the athletic sort." 



The year Book 



DAVID GUARNACCIA 
Harvard 
Football (3,4). Basketball (^, 4). Track (3,4). Debating Club (4). 

"He prov'd best man i' the field." 



'Dave" 




RUTH HARNDEN 
Business 
Sec. Commercial Club (4V 

"Here comes Ruth, one vast, substantial smile" 



"Riiffu 




HELEN HATCH 
B. U. 

"With a smile on her lips". 



"Hatchie' 




JAMES HARPER 
Undecided 
Track (4:i. Debating Club (4). 

"Faint heart ne'er won fair lady.' 



TH0A4AS HENNESSY 
Business 

"A viild mannered man." 



"Bozo" 



"Tom' 




THE YEAR BOOK 




Football (4). 



WILIIAM HURTON 
Business 

'Must be from Dcrnuida, hi" and slroiii 



"Bill 




Lieut. Battalion. 



Knh'NFTfl HUNT 
Undecided 

"/ love to be anion" the lasses.' 




Dramatic Club ()). 



i<A'nu-:Ri\r. iakhman 

V. of N. II. 
Sec. Debating Club (4). 

"Ob lady, lady, tunc have you dared. 
.So op to school to eoiue iiiipretiared/ 



LHO\'ARI) /DLL 
P. G. 
Debating Club (4). "Charm School' (4). 

"All ;.ireat ituni are dyiiiii and I don't lee! v.'ell myself.' 



'Kat' 



"Leu" 




m-:NRy i.i.siima\' 

Business 

'l.illle /xM's" should he seen and not heard.' 



"Harry' 



THE YEAR Book 



Debating Club (4). 



PAUL MADDEN 
Business 

"Slow and <.itre." 




MARGARBT MAG HE 
Comptometer School 
Class Treasurer (3). Prom Committee (3). 

"As good be out of the World as out of Fashion." 



■Slippy ' 




Student Council (3.4) 



JAMES McTEAGUE 
Telegraph} 
Lt. Battalion (3). Capt. (4). Traffic Squad (4) 

"Brimful of Brains". 



".Mw: 




MYER MILLER 

Undecided 
Baseball Manager (4). Year Book (4). 

"A willing heart adds feather to the heel" 



'Meo 




Baseball (3). 



GEORGE MOULT ON 
Undecided 

"Take time enough; all other graces 
Will soon fill up their proper places. 



'Dud" 




tHE Vear Boor 




ARTHUR NHWCOMB. JR. "Newk'' 

Middlebury College 
Orchestra (1,2,3,4,). Student Council (4). Booster Staff (4). Editor-in-chief Year 
Book (4). 

"He shows himself of sterling worth." 




JOHN NORTH 
B. LI. 



"Jack Keefe" 



Football (2,3,4). Basketball (3,4). Track (2,3,4). Class President (2). Base- 
ball (4). 

"Oh that Fuller Brush head effect." 




Football (2,3,4) 



M.AURICE O'CONNELL 
Business 

"Let's laugh at life." 



"Okie" 




MARJORIE PALMER 
Undecided 
Dramatic Club (3,4). Glee Club (3). Basketball (4). Debatjng Club (4). 

"Marjoric is one nice girl." 




Lots PARKS 
Framingham Normal 
Orchestra (4). Home Economics Club (4). 

"And mistress of herself though China fall.' 



THE YEAR BOOK 



Booster Staff (4). 



ALVAH PERKINS 
P. G. 

"Whose Utile body lodged a mighty mind.' 



"Perkie' 




DORIS PERKINS 
Nurses' Training School 
'Peddler of Hearts" (3). Basketball (4). 

"Patience and perseverance tcill remove mountain'^ — even in basket ball." 



"Dot' 




PAULINE PETERSON ■'Pete- 

Boston University 
Glee Club (3,4). Traffic Squad (3,4). Sec. Debating Club (4). Dramatic Club 
(.3,4). Year Book Staff Artist (4). 

"The hand that follovjs intellect can achieve." 




RUDOLPH PETERSON 
P G. 
'Peddler of Hearts" (3). "Charm School" (4). 

"Sighed and looked unutterable things." 



••Pctc 




Basket ball (4). 



STANLEY PETERSON 
Undecided 

'Why isn't everyone happy like me?" 



"Pete" 




THE YEAR BOOK 




DORCAS WOODBURY 
Undecided 
"Peddler of Hearts" (3). Glee Club (3). Basketball (3). 
'Charm School" (4). 

"One ear it heard — 

At the other out it ivent.' 



HI-I.HN RAMSDELL 
Radcliffe 

Student Council (4). Salutatorian (4). Year Book (4). 

"Persistent enert^y brings results". 



"Mickey" 
item Reporter ()). 




ELDON RANDALL 

Undecided 



Football (3,4j. Track (3,4) 



"Take Iroin my life all icorry and care 
And put in their place a soil arm-chair.' 



"Bone 




EVELYN REYNOLDS 
Busmess 
Commercial Club (4). 

"E In tat ion — attention leithont mlenlion. 



"Ren ' 




ERED RICH 
Un.decideil 
Orchestra (1.2,3.41. Student Council (i). 1 rallic Scpiad (<.4) \ice-IVesidcnt 
Commercial Club (4). l^mm C;<)mmittce (4), Reception Committee (4). 
"And oh the jla>h of t.us langlnnii bine eyes!" 



THE YEAR BOOK 



MA BH I. LR RICH A RDSON 

Undecided 
Glee Club (3). Commercial Cluh (-1). I'radic S(|uad (.3,4), 

"They are wise who listen but talk li'lle." 



Commercial Club (4). 



liSTllHR ROACH 

Business 

'.4 (/((/('/ person but likable 



■'Richie 



"Es 




101. A SAMUELS 
L ndecided 
Glee Club (3). Basket ball (4). 

"Trouble troiihU-s me not, 
Neitlier do I trouble trouble. 



'Sam" 






JOSEPH SARDEIJ.A 
Tufts College 
Cross country (2). Track (3). l-'ootball (3,4). Mgr. Track (4) 
e'lub (4). 

"Joe has well deserved bis fame — 

He's never been vamped by any dame." 



" Morley" 
Sec. Debating 




VIOLET SAVAGE 
Commercial Club (4). 

Burdett Business Coiiege 

"The world belongs to the conscientious." 



TV" 




^^ 



THE YEAR BOOK 




RONALD SHfiRAfAN 
Undecided 
Basket ball (3). "Charm School" (4). 

''The ladies call hint sweet. 



'Spud" 




MORTON SHERMAN "Skam" 

Business 
5asket ball (3). Capt. 2nd team (3). Baseball (3). Asst. Printing Instructor (3,4). 

"Just a mighty fine chap". 




Debating Club (4). 



HENRY STORTl 
Business 

"A quiet man of truth and sincerity." 




CATHERINE SULLIVAN 
Llndecided 
Glee Club (2,3,4). "Peddler of Hearts" (3). "Charm School" (4). 
Squad (3,4). 

"It's the song ye sing and the smile ye wear 
That's a-makin' the sunshine everywhere." 



"Kate" 
Traffic 




Commercial Club (4). 



MARION SURRETTE 
Business 

'Life's too much trouble". 



"Cooie" 



t^E YEAR Book 



Commercial Club (4). 



CATHERiyJE TALBOT 
Burdett Business College 

"Say Utile but look -wise." 



'Kitty" 



HARRY TOUNGE 
Tufts Pre-medical 
Traffic Squad (3,4). Prom Committee (3,4). Mgr. Football (4). Year Book (4). 
'Charm School" (4). Reception Committee (4). 

"A jolly smile, a genial face, 

hi hearts of all, won him a place 




Football (4). 



RALPH THRESHER 
Boston University 

"Do not give me pomp and power 
Nor the ladies pure and sweet 
Angel songs nor heavenly joys 
Just stand aside and let me — eat!' 



"Fat' 




MINA TINGLEY 
Boston Art School 
Northfield Seminary and Pinkerton .Academy (1,2,3). 

"When we see her, black envy stirs 

// only we could have hair like hers." 



"Red' 




CLYDE TYLER •■Toby" 

Football (2,3,4). Baseball (2,3,4). Cross-country (2). Basketball (3,4). Track 
(4). Student Council (4). Prom Committee (3). Year Book (4). 

"/ never dare to be as funny as I can." 




T H E YEAR BOOK 




VIRGINIA ULRICI "Gin" 

P. G. 
Vice-President Girls' Debating Club (4). "Peddler of Hearts" (3). Booster Staff (4). 
Glee Club (3). Year Book (4). 

"Virtiiiila L'lrici n her name 
Abbreviated is she. 
She likes a fioml lime jusi the <ame 
And she i.',!ggles and chuckles in glee". 




Lieut. Battalion. 



THOMAS WALSH 
Undecided 

"The answer to some maiden's prayer. 



'Tommie" 




MARY WHITE 
Burdett Business College 

7 must have liberty — to bltnc on ichom I please." 



"Al" 




FRANCIS WIIITEHF.AD 
Bentley School of Accounting 

"lake things easy boys." 




AI.TTIIA WIIITNTY 
Music 
Orchestra (4). Glee Club (4). (Commercial Club (4). 

",S7'(' may appear demure 

lUit I leniddii'l be too sure." 



THE VeAR book 



Commercial Club (4). 



GLADYS WUIThJFA 
journalism 

"Oh uirh! There soes a man!" 



"G 




Basket ball (3,4). 



ELEANOR WINKLER 

Framingham Normal 

"llcr hair is rcJ. 
Ilcr nature gay, 
A lid <,he is happy 
All the clay." 



"Carrots" 




Lieut. Battalion. 



MAURICE WALSH 
Busine-s Sch(>ol 

'A firm yet eaiitioit: mind' 



"Mali 




THERESA COLLINS 

Salem Normal 

"Tessie" is a dandy girl, a boon companion she. 

And if you get to know her welL a good friend she ivill he." 



"Tess 



KATHERINE GERRY 
Bryant-Stratton 

'Oh, what is the cud of Study? Let me know." 



"Speed' 



THE YEAR BOOK 



EVELYN GRAHAM "Evre" 

Business 

"Ah, well-a-day. 

We'll miss your smile when you're away." 



NORMA PERKINS 
Salem Normal 

"Calm and ttnruffled as a summer sea.' 



CHRISTINE SMITH "Smit" 

Business 

"Her stature tall — 

/ hate a dumpy womau." 



THE YEAR BOOK 



^iti^rarg 



THE YEAR BOOK 




Pedalling Through History 



W'e mounted our bicycles, my friend and I, at eight o'clock of a mistv April morning. (We had in- 
tended to start at six, hut we later decided that eight o'clock was belter, since neither of us woke up until after 
that early hour. ) Our destination and route were unknown even to ourselves. We simply rode along, 
traversing the woodland parkways as far as possible, and feeling in the best of spirits. 

FMncung ourselves in Medford, for want of a be'.ter plan, we turned towards .\rlington. An oppor- 
tunity to "tune up" our "bikes" and erase a few squeaks and rattles was afforded by a half-hour stop, at the 
house of scni'j old acquaintances. While there, we perused our road-map and fixed as our goal the town 
of Concord. 

As we rolled along towards Lexington, the day became finer and clearer. Being enthusiasts of bicx'cle 
riding, we could hardly have been careladen and melan:hol_\-. Besides, the ride was interesting. Apjiroach- 
ing Lexington, relics of the old colonial days began to appear. Here st<)f)d out an old, patriarchal elm 
tree, repatched and braced, with perhaps a bronze plate bearing some traditional tale: there a quaint old 
house seemed to look upon its surroundings with a dignity befitting its age. (Such houses frequently bore 
a sign advertising antiques as their wares). 

Lexington Common proved a delightful stopping place for a moment's rest. We inspected every 
monument we saw, reading their inscriptions. These we found especially interesting because they were 
often connected with incidents in books we had read, not to speak of "that ol' hist'ry book". We noticed the 
point where Paul Revere and his henchmen were stopped by a British patrol. The town of Lincoln, as we 
learned later, took us only a few seconds to cross. This may not seem so astonishing when the fact is re- 
vealed to you that our road crossed only a corner of Lincoln, for a distance of but one hundred yards! 

There was a humorous note in the reading of the signboards. At one point, the tra\eler is informed 
that he must journey seven miles to reach Concord. About a mile further on, he ma\' trust in another Ju- 
das and be astonished to find that the aforesaid town of Concord has picked itself up and retreated two miles, 
making a total of eight miles to go. Thus, you see, seeing is not always believing. 

While yet a short distance from Concord, we noticed the former home of Nathaniel Hawthorne. We 
walked that same, soft path, up over the fir-clad hill, which he trod so many times. "The whispering pines 
and the hemlocks" were, beyond a doubt, an inspiration to him. The house was small, brown, rather old, 
and weatherbeaten. To me it had an odd, yet homely appearance. 

Indeed the whole town of Concord seemed rather picturesque. We marked the large number of ven- 
erable elms, which lined the roads on both sides. Farms, with all their oddities, were numerous. The old 
battleground, where was fought the first battle of the Revolutionary War, lies but a short distance from the 
center of the town; there we took ourselves, a short time after noon. 

The approach to the scene was walled with tall pine trees. We noticed, at the end of the pines, the 
shaft which tells the story of the battle; then, little by little, the view opened until we stood by the bridge 
and gazed on the whole panorama. The Concord River looked much the same as it must have looked on 
that fateful day, long ago. it was swelled by freshets and the flat, surrounding meadows were largely inun- 
dated. Yet the river itself was more sluggish and placid than our own little Saugus River. The old wood- 
en bridge had long since been replaced by a more modern, concrete slructine. A pity thai the rustic old 
bridges must needs give way to things of stone. 

The finest part of the whole view was the Minute-.Man statute. Surmounting a stone monument. 
stood that rugged representation of American manhood, his llintlock held read\-, and his plow thrust aside. 
Nor did we pass b)' the tomb of the fallen British soldiers, for no one can sa\ that they were lacking in 
bravery. As we passed on from their grave, a few sleek, gray squirrels were scampering along the stone 



THE YEAR BOOK 

wall, perhaps the very wall which sheltered some of the Yankee defendants. However, though excellent the 
view, our gaze wandered back again to that fine, rugged statue, and we read once more Emerson's honored 
stanza in the inscription: 

"By the rude bridge that arch'd the flood, 

Their flag to April's breeze unfurl'd, 

Here once the embattled farmers stood 

And fired the shot heard round the world." A. P. 

There Are Shocks And Shocks 

A dingy, little Ford wheezed along an old country road. It could be called a Ford only by courtesy. 
Its top was in rags; its upholstery was in the same condition, while the engine had reached that stage where 
it didn't care whether it li\ed or died. Flowever, crouched tenselv over the wheel was a >oung girl of col- 
lege age, dressed in the height of fashion. Unheeding the bumps, unheeding the groanings of the tortured 
engine, this young lady kept steadily on down the road. 

While this race was on, to the south of her a steam roller was approaching, positively burning up the 
distance. This sight (except for the speed) was not strange, as the road needed leveling badly enough, but 
the }'oung driver was most certainly not doing this as an occupation. He was well dressed, and was un- 
doubtedly a university student, lie seemed under a strain, and the perspiration and dust soon made him 
look more like a colored gentleman than the white man he was intended to be. 

At that moment a train whistle was heard over to the east. Upon observation, it was found that 
the train consisted of only one engine and no cars. There was a young man driving it who seemed to be 
engineer and fireman, too. He had removed the coat of his business suit, and he was now getting all he pos- 
sibly could out of the locomotive. 

Suddenly the drone of an aeroplane was heard overhead. Soon it could be seen, a speck fast growing 
larger, coming from the west. In it was an aviator of about twentj-eight years of age. He seemed to be 
racing for the same objective as the others. 

Finally, the rickety old Ford came to a wheezing halt beside a meadow, across from which was a 
large rambling farmhouse. Into this building the girl ran without waiting to stop her engine. The steam 
roller came to a pufiing halt in front of the little Ford, and its occupant ran into the farmhouse also. Short- 
ly afterwards, the young man who had driven the locomotive came rushing across the meadow, caught up 
with the aviator, who had just landed, and they followed. 1 lowever, all four soon emerged from the house 
laughing in a fit of great enjoyment. 

"Betty", the aviator asked of the young lady, "where did }'ou get that specimen of a conveyance which 
1 suppose you call a Ford?" 

She replied, "Well, after 1 got that telegram from Mother saying, 'Come quick father had shock have 
neius for you,' 1 just dashed out of the dormitory and took the first train to Forington. There 1 found 1 had 
to wait because there was a fire in a warehouse, so I jumped out. 1 saw no car in sight except this one 
which an old junkman was trying to sell to a negro. The engine was running (as the salesman was explain- 
ing it to his purchaser) so 1 rushed over, jumped into the rickety thing and went sailing off. But, of course, 
I'll return it," she ended soberly, with a twinkle in her eye that belied her voice. "By the way, Larry, 
where did you get the steam roller? 1 didn't know you had bought one." 

"Well, 1 — 1 rather think 1 did a dashing out act myself. 1 took a street car as far as it would go; 1 
had to wait too long for a train; and when 1 saw a steam roller in the middle of the road and the road- 
men eating lunch, 1 marched over, got in and managed to get the thing started. I didn't have any idea how 
to stop it, and 1 nearly ran over the Ford before 1 found the "combination" of the pesky thing. But, Jim- 
my, how on earth did you run off with a locomotive?" 

Jimmy grinned, "First let me tell you what I was doing when 1 got my telegram. You know that 
fussy Mr. Jacob Merryweather? I was having an important conference with him. 1 leaped over the desk, 
left Merry gazing after me with his mouth open and made a dash for the train yards. There 1 found no 
trains running at that time, so seeing an engine deserted, 1 jumped into it and let her go!" 

"It's lucky you haven't got heart trouble or didn't think of collisions," said the aviator. "But per- 
haps you wonder what 1 did to get here. Well! 1 stole nothing, neither did 1 kill anyone. 1 only "bor- 
rowed" the General's little scout plane that he had left at the airport while he talked with the Colonel." 

Then after a pause he continued, "If Mother had only worded that telegram differently. But the 
joke's on us. To think that Dad's shock was only a temporary one caused by his finding oil on the farm, while 
we've given about fifty people an equal, if not a worse shock, in trying to get here in time. 

M. R. 



THE YEAR BOOK 

Milton 

As men have passed along Life's way 
And met its trials from day to day, 
How few have caught the vision rare 
Which leads them on to do and dare! 

How few have held a purpose true 

Which, though unknown and praised by few. 

Has lifted them from common soil 

And crowned them with the "meed of toil." 

Ah, here was one who knew that Fame 
Lay not in dazzling wealth or name. 
He learned that Life was something more 
Then earthly praise and miser's store. 

So may we, through the hastening days. 
Though be our labors free from praise, 
Remember that man's own true state 
Is that which marks him, small or great. 

A. N. 



To What End 

To what end is all our striving 
Greater knowledge to attain 

In the fields of art and science 
That a higher peak we gain? 

Why these years of work and labor 
Why these days of toil and strife. 

If like nations gone before us, 
All are taken from this life? 

Building from the best that's given. 

Making finer day by day. 
Years of thought and hope and courage 

All in gore are washed away. 

In the past great cultured cities 

Grew beyond our greatest height; 

But the hand of war outreaching 

Wiped them wholly from the sight. 

To this end are we too moving 

Like the cities of the past, 
Shall the war dog of tomorrow 

Crush and bury us at last? 

M. L. A. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



Suspicion! 



Cursed is ungrounded suspicion, 
Deceit, distrust, and untruth; 
It takes up your time, ruins your mind 
With things that are crude and uncouth. 

Some people always are idle. 
With nothing to do with their time, 
into their thoughts creeps suspicion. 
And slowly poisons their minds. 

Tis rare that a busy person 
Has a chance for useless chatter. 
About things which are only gossip, 
And really do not matter. 

When you hear some idle rumor 
And you don't know what to do, 
"Do unto others as you would wish 
Others to do unto you." 

If 3'our thoughts are clean, and your mind is pure. 
You'll not distrust unless you are sure. 

B. L. G. 






The Sentinel 

Oh, mighty elm, who like a sentinel stands 

Guarding, watching, with thy mighty power 

Tell me of thy past, oh mighty tower, 

From whose top a wondrous view expands, 

Tell me by whose firm and steady hands 

Thou wast planted in those days of yore. 

Tell me of the cruel storms that tore 

Through thy leafy boughs and growing strands. 

Ah, great and mighty elm, thou hast done well 

To stand the seething gale, the wintry blast; 

To stand undaunted 'neath the thunder's roar 

And see the other trees which round thee fell. 

Thou shalt be king and ruler to the last, 

Until the winds shall round thee sing no more. 

A. E. N. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



The Meaning of Flowers 

Flowers in their infinite forms and colors! The\' entrance one with their sol't beauty, their marvel- 
ous coloring, their delicate petals. They simply breathe, and all the air about them is delightfully per- 
1'i:med. .\fter they have gone, their fragrance lingcis like a sweet memory loath to depart. 

\'es, we admire — even love the flowers for their beauty and delicate aroma, but he who is thoughtful 
will discern a deeper meaning in them. They are works of art which man, with all his knowledge and 
skill can ne\er even imitate. Each liny blossom has a message all its own to impart to mankind. Per- 
haps the most noticeable of these is faith. When the liny wild flowers of earlv spring blossom on the hill 
side, in spite of cold and wind, is this not an exhibitio;^ of fi,m failh in their (Creator? They never fear de- 
struction, but know that lie in Ills infinite mercy and care v\ill watch o\er and protect them. Christ point- 
ed them out as an example when he said, "Consider t'l^ lihes of the field, how the\- grow; the>- toil not neith- 
er do they spin, yet 1 say unto you that even Solomon in all Ids glorv was not arra}'ed like one of these.'' 
What greater honor could be conferred on any person or thing? 

Idowers are the essence of purity, especially tlu lilv' is innocence undefiled. The deep red rose speaks 
to us of love and loyalty. The liny blue violet in spit: of its seeming coquetry. Tells of truth. Even the 
legal purple ast(jr has its message of faith and fearles.^neis to imparl, for it blooms bravel\' in the frost, af- 
ter all others have passed. 

Thc\' all, especially the sunny marigolds and dairdes bn^athe happiness into the air and into the lives 
of human beings. 

The)' bring out the best that is in us. Many a rough man has been known to weep at the sight of a 
sweet little blossom. I low man)' sacred memories are cherished with drietl flowers! Yes. each gi\'es its 
little message, but taken all together the)' sa)' in a soil )'el eN'erlasting chorus, "There is a God in llea\en: 

He is Love." 

H. W. S. 



Balto, A Do" Hero 



Manv people, even man)' with greal intellectual abilil)'. sa)' ihnl a dog cannol be a hero; bul the)' 
should know better. We are all sure that Balto. the Alaskan musher dog, knew there were hundreds of li\'es 
at stake when he fought so gallantly as the leader of the team of dogs that drew the serum sled successfully 
into Nome. 

There was the city in the far North stricken with. aii epidemic of diphtheria. There was the package 
of serum to be delivered, somehow, to the only two peo ile who knew how to prevent the spread of the disease, 
one doctor and one nurse. There were drivers read)' t.) make ihc trip oxer ihe snow. Do \'ou not suppose 
the dogs realized how much depended on them? 

Through the widerness, lap after lap, iiri\'er af.er dri\er, and learn after team, went ihe precious 
packet of life-sa\'ing fluid, the toxin-antitoxin. .'Xnd when (jiinnar Kasson's leam. with bra\'e Balto in the 
lead, came Uj the end of their rela)' which was next lo ihe last <>n ihe schedule, missed their relief leam in ihe 
awful storm, and decided to push on over the extra sixt)' mile stretch, no one can doubt Balto and his dogs 
understood and resoh'ed to give their last atom of strength. 

There is much glory for drivers Kalland, Shannon, Sepaila and the others, and for each faithful dog 
v\ ho made the run. \'et Kasson and Balto stand out be:a'!se the)' diil double dul)'. The)' are a \er)' modest 
pair of heroes. They bring to mind Admiral Peary's tribute to his noble dogs: 

"Gi\'e equal hoiiors !o the humbler line 

Who shared the perils of the arctic night. 
There let the hero lay his kindl)' hantl 

Lipon some noble ct)mrade's shagg)' mane. 
And deeply writ let this true legend stand: 

'Except for these my quest had been in vain.' " 

L P. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



^tljlrtics 



The year book 




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Football 

The Football team started its season in a blaze of glory by giving the Danvers boys the worst beating of 
the season. Our bo\'s certainly showed the goods in this game and a successful season was predicted. We 
then lost a few close games which seemed to take heart out of the team. If a team ever had bad luck our.^ 
ccrtainl}' did, losing games with Stoneham, Winchester and Woburn b\' unlucky breaks. Our boys next met 
their "friendl\' enemies," Melrose, who proved to have one of the best teams which ever represented that 
city. The Wakefield boys more than held their own for the tlrst quarter, but a break in favor of Melrose 
soon gave the latter team the leatl. At Arlington, Wakefield handed the opposing team the biggest surprise 
when the "Champs" were only able to score six points in the first half. The Arlington coach highly compli- 
mented the Wakefield boys. 

Next fall. Coach Dower will be without the ser\ices of Capt. Finney, a good leader and fighter from 
start to finish; "Dave" Guarnaccia, the fastest running "back" in the Mystic Valley League, with the excep- 
tion of Flint of Melrose; Gilchrist and O'Connell, two snappy ends; "Fat" Thresher, who received honor- 
able mention by a Woburn sport writer; "Toby" Tyler, one of the best all around athletes in lligh 
School; ilurton and Crocker, two scrappy "tackles"; Norman Arnold and "Jack" North, two wide awake 
players; and last but not least, "Bone" Randall, the terror of opposing ends. 

In Capt. Tasker, who was chosen end on the All-Mystic Valley Eleven, this High School will have a 
smart leader for the 1925 team and with the aid of Coach Dower, Wakefield should rank well at the top for 
the coming season. 





1924 


schedule 




Wakefield 


19 


Danvers 


7 


Wakefield 





Stoneham 


6 


Wakefield 


6 


Winchester 


7 


Wakefield 





Woburn 


3 


Wakefield 





Watertown 


IS 


Wakefield 





Melrose 


27 


Wakefield 


31 


Reading 


6 


Wakefield 


6 


Arlington 


27 


Wakefield 


14 


Lexington 


27 



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THE YEAR BOOK 

Girls' Basketball 

Our girls' basketball did not make a name for itself until this year. It was necessary to spend a 
great deal of time last year in organizing the team. With the exception of two games played with Maiden the 
team was practically inactive. 

Last year the juniors were the "Champs" so that this year practically every one of them were able to 
make the first team. 

Bertha Gersinovitch and Capt. Edythe Grant, since they had played together for two years as forwards, 
were well trained for team work. The two guards, "Sam" and "Doris" played well in every game. E. 
Winkler, jumping center, always did her best to get the tip off, while Ruth Purdy, side center certainly could 
cover her man. 

The girls on the first team were very fortunate in having such loyal substitutes. Among these subs, 
Alice Drugan, has an excellent chance for the team next year. "Ally" played in several games this year 
and made a good showing. The following girls came to most every practice, Mary O'Connor, B. Farrelio, 
S. Berg, and Marjorie Palmer. 

The games played and their scores are as follows: 



Wakefield 


4 


Reading 


6S 


Wakefield 


24 


Methuen 


21 


Wakefield 


27 


Reading 


47 


Wakefield 


32 


Methuen 


9 


Wakefield 


18 


Belmont 


43 


Wakefield 


32 


Belmont 


40 


Wakefield 


39 


Alumnae 


4 



The girls who will be missed on the gvm fioor next year are: "f^de", "Gus", "Wink", "Dot", and 
"Sam". 

Great credit is due Miss Blaikie, gym director, and Miss Weaver of the Sargent School of Boston, who 
coached the team and put it in fine shape. 

Boys' Basketball 

1924-25 Schedule 



Wakefield 


46 


Reading 


45 


Wakefield 


37 


Akmini 


15 


Wakefield 


32 


Brockton 


35 


Wakefield 


10 


Chelsea 


19 


Wakefield 


40 


Framingham 


7 


Wakefield 


18 


Natick 


17 


Wakefield 


10 


Winchester 


?7 


Wakefield 


22 


Watertown 


23 


Wakefield 


17 


Winthrop 


26 


Wakefield 


7 


Brockton 


30 


Wakefield 


14 


Chelsea 


28 


Wakefield 


12 


Watertown 


18 


Wakefield 


24 


Winchester 


25 


Wakefield 


16 


Framingham 


15 


Wakefield 


14 


Winthrop 


16 


Wakefield 


31 


Nalick 


14 


Wakefield 


11 


Reading 


14 



Winning 6 out of 17 games is a much better record than was made by last year's team. Wakefield, 
playing schools far out of its class, went through the season better th;m was expected. Next \'ear Coach 
E^emis will be without the services of North, lyler, Guarnaccia and Finney, and will certainly miss his first 
team men; but with Tasker, Brewer, Salvati, Talbot, llorrig;in, Newell, Robbins, Crosb\', Dutton and Dulong, 
Wakefield should nevertheless develop an exceptionally good team. 



THE Y E A [^ BOOK 




Cross-Country 



After a lapse of four years, cross-country is again established in Wakefield High School. At the be- 
ginning of the year Coach Bemis called out the boys and a good number responded. 

Our first meet was with Woburn High School at Woburn. We were defeated by one point, the score be- 
ing 27-28. Capt. iMcKeon ran first all the way and won, llannon fought hard all the way and came in 
up in front. Coupal, Edmands, and Marmo also finished and placed. 

We then arranged a return meet with Woburn at Wakefield. We defeated the team by a score of 
25-30. McKeon came in first. 1 lannon ran a good race and beat his man to the tape. Coupal, Edmands, 
Marmo, Kane, Walsh, LeBlanc, and Snowdon showed up well and have the promise of being first-class 
runners. 

Our next meet was with St. John's Prep. School of Danvers. We defeated them on their own 
court by a score of 26-29. This was the most exciting race of the year. McKeon finished first in good 
time. Coupal and his man ran neck and neck to the finish, Coupal winning by a few yards. Edmands 
ran with his man all the way and at the finish he showed a sprint that was seldom seen on a track before. 
Hannon ran a very good race. Me had a poor start but was soon up in the lead. Baker, the six-mile 
champion of Prep, schools of New York, was easily beaten by .McKeon and Hannon. 

Our last meet of the season was with Ringe Technical School of Cambridge. The day was the cold- 
est one on record, but the boys ran a very good race. We were defeated by a score of 40-22. McKeon fin- 
ished second, followed by Hannon, Coupal, and Edmands. Sardella came out for the first time and finished 
in good time. The Wakefield boys found it hard to run a course without hills. 

Next year, the Wakefield Pligh School will be represented by a very strong team. With the excep- 
tion of R. Edmands who will graduate, the team will be a veteran one and should make a strong bid for 
the New England Championship. 



T II E YEAR BOOK 



Baseball 1925 

Thirty or more candidates reported to Coach Bemis' call for practice in April. Of the thirty, Task- 
er, Tyler, Brewer, Flannigan, I lorrigan, Salvati, and Dulong were the only veterans. The first team was soon 
selected by Coach Bemis. It consisted of Tyler, c, Tasker lb, Salvati 2b, Brewer ss, Talbot 3b, Flannigan 
If, Crosb}' cf, "Jazz" rf, with 1 lorrigan. North and Murph.y as pitchers. Mgr. iVlyer Miller and Faculty 
Mgr. R. M. Kinder ha\e arranged a hard schedule for this year and it will keep the boys fighting all sea- 
son. Mgr. Miller is hard at work and popular with the team. A successful season is predicted. 



4<^.^^^^.^.{<^^4i^^.!<i{t^':^.j.Fji>;^t|i49^ij> 



Track 

In 1*^)22 Irack was gi\en up at the Wakefield Iligii School on account of the lack of interest. It was 
in the Spring of l')24 ihal a few bo\'S were determined lo re\i\e this sport. The boys got together and 
practiced every fair liay. We were represented in the M>stic Valley Interscholastics in which Wakefield 
scored nine points, Ciw being one by Guarnaccia, two by Martin, one by McKcon and Sardella. On June 7, 
Guarnaccia and Sardella took part in the "1 larvard-lnterscholaslics." 

In the Spring of 192^ track was re\'ived to a greater extent. I'he candidates were called out early in 
March and about twenty-five boys showed up. Mr. Kinder did very much to put us through and arranged 
six meets which were as follows: 

April 17, W. II. S. Interclass .Meet 

April 24, Wakefield at Melrose 

May I, Wakefield at iMalden 

May 8, Wakefield at .Metluien 

May 15, Wakefield at Arlington 

May 22, Wakefiekl at Arlington 

In the Interclass meet Guarnaccia starred with twent\-three points, .McKeon thirteen and Sardella 
twelve. 



THE YEAR BOOK 




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WAKEFIELD COMMON 

Where this year's baseball games took place 



THE YEAR BOOK 



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THE YEAR BOOK 




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THE YEAR BOOK 




BATTALI 

nOTES 




This is the second year that military drill has been compulsory at our High School and it has proved 
very successful. Besides having a larger number of n.w cadets we have a number of boys who have had a 
year's experience and are familiar with the fundamentals 

The first se\'en months of the school year were spent in drilling on North A\'enue when the weather 
permitted, otherwise in the Armory; but now the Battalion is obliged to march to the Common where there is 
more room to drill on extended order and prize drill tactics. 

Our military instructor, Sergeant Ernest Munroe, has deemed it best to take up fewer phases of mil- 
itary drill and devote the time to instructing the cadets in the more important phases, such as military cour- 
tesy, bearing of a soldier and marching. 

The appearance of the Battalion is very good this year and a stiff competitive prize drill is expected 
as the companies are almost equal in military ability. 

Roster 

Major Myrton l-inney 
Adjutant John Lilley 
Supply Officer, Maurice Anderson; Sgt. Major, Berton Cogswell; Supply Sgt., Sidney Grant. 

Company A 

Capt., Fred Rich; 1st Lieut., Maurice Walsh; 2nd Lieut., Michael Kelley; 1st Sgt., E. Flannigan; 
Sgts., 1. Melendy, T. Gleason, L. Laughlin, M. Anderson, P. Donegan, R. del\Laselles; Corps., G. McMaster, 
H. Fowler, A. White, R. Dutton, E. Dulong. 

Company B 

Capt. Walter Barry, 1st Lieut. Kenneth Hunt. Ind Lieut. Louis Anderson, 1st Sgt. D. Robbins, Sgts. 
E. Horrigan, A. Vidito, J. Neiss, M. Curran, W. Bemin, H. Boyton ; C^orps. B. Boothby, P. Black, A. Tuttle, 
J. Lilley, J. Climo. 

Company C 

Capt. James McTeague, 1st Lieut. Thomas Walsh, 2nd Lieut. John Sheehan, 1st Sgt. E. Cronican, Sgts. 
R. Santoes, J. Roach, J. Dyer, W. Waite, C. McCarthy J. Butler; Corps. E. Liljestrom, R. Brewer, R. Moul- 
ton, W. O'Connell, W. Allyn, R. Connelly. 

Company D 

Capt. Emory Eaton, 1st Lieut. Norman Bayrd, 2nd Lieut, Charles Kady, 1st Sgt. R. Sproule, Sgts. H. 
Bauer, P. Nuto, L. Frost; Corps. C. Dow, G. Tuttle, E. Packard, S. Caldwell, A. Sherman. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



QLUB5 



AHJ) 




VITl 




THE YEAR BOOK 



The Booster 

The "Booster" has outgrown its cradle. From six contributing editors the staff has been increased 
to fifteen, from seniors down to freshmen. The "Booster" is now three years old and quite a thriving 
product. 

This vear, by way of variety, the staff has put on some no\'elty numbers among which the most 
prominent have been the Poetry, the Battalion, the Junior "Prom", (edited by the Junior Class), the Alum- 
ni number, (edited exclusively by the Alumni of the Wakefield High School), the Nonsense and the Literary 
numbers. The "Booster" is edited on Friday of every week ami is devoted entirely to the "Propagation 
of School Spirit". This bulletin is not wholly for entertainment nor wholly for classic literature. It tries 
to strike a happy medium and in comparison with som.e of the other high school papers that are sent to us for 
criticism from schools of good standing, the "Booster" ranks highly. If the "Booster's" literary column has 
not yet reached its desired goal, it wants the reader to remember that it is striving for it. it is of a higher 
standing already than some of its sister papers and as our school grows, we hope our Booster will grow with it. 

For the past three years the "Booster" has had very good editors and competent staffs. A good 
deal of the praise (if the "Booster" is to receive any) goes to Mr. Arthur Fulton of the faculty. Every week, 
the material for the paper goes into Mr. Fulton's capable hands for his censorship, and many a time when 
contributions ha\e been rather scant, A4r. I'ulton has gL'nerously gi\en his time to fill in the vacant columns 
with witty poems and sayings. 

The senior class, and especially the editor-in-chief and the seniors on the "Booster" staff extend their 
best wishes for a prospertxis and thriving "Booster" for the coming \ears. 



Officers' Party 



The annual Officers' Party which took place in the high school "g\m", Frida\', January 16, was one of 
the best ever staged in Wakefield. 

The attraction of the evening, the grand march, composed of Wakelield, (.jloucester and Woburn 
officers, vvas led by Major Myrton Finney and Miss Doris Duley. The delicate and gay hues of the girls' 
evening gowns [produced an effective contrast against the khaki of the officers' uniforms. During intermis- 
sion, as a special feature, an exhibition drill by a selected compan\' from the battalion was carried out splen- 
didly under the supervision of Chaplain Walter Ban'}'. This exhibition drew \ery fa\orable criticisms Irom 
the ofiicers (jf the above mentioned schools. 

Mrs. Finney, Mrs. Barry, Mrs. l-aton, and Mis-. Helen Crocker of the facult\- were the matrons. 

McPartland's Orchestra furnished very good music. 



Senior Valentine Party 



One of the most delightful and successful jiarti's e\er held in the higii school, was the Senior Party, 
which look place February 13th, in the "gym" in the f:)rm of a \alenline I^arlw The tiecoralions which 
were attractive creations of red and white, revealed much care on the part of the decorators, 

;\fter the introduction to the matrons who werj Mrs. McCloskey, .Mrs. 11. W. Smith. .Mrs. l;. .\. 
Smith, jMrs. Maroney, and Miss Lillian Hurley of the faculty, the students and their friends danced until 
midnight. Very good music was furnished by Drugan's orchestra. 

During intermission, Myrton Finney, Norman Arnokl, I Iarr\- Tounge and Louis .Xmiro, members 
of the senior class, furnished a clever bit of amusement with Iheir "Beillam Orchestra" which concluded with 
a clog dance by Harry Tounge. Emily Smith then ga\e a charming reading entitleil, "The La\- ol Lothario 
Lee", which was enjoyed by all, as were the two daint\' toetlances b\' Carol\ n Reams which followed. 

Among the special fealures of llic exening. wer^- ihe balloon dance, when red and white balloons were 
Iloaletl down from the balcoii)' and the novelty dance, when colored sircamers and \arious attractive lavors 
were showered on the dancers. lidilh Dowling and Waller IkiriN- were the forlunale couple in the elimination 
dance. 

The Senior Class should be congratulated on its "Prom." ami miicli creilil, without doubt, is due the 
committee in charge, which was composed of Lores AlcCloske\'. I niil\' Smith. Mae .Maronew I'unice Smilh. 
Irma Foster, Harry Tounge, Fred Rich, Norman Arnokl, Edith Dowling and Helen Clothe}-. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



Boy 



s Debating Club 



Only ten boys attL-nded the first meeting of the Bo\s' Debating Club on Tuesday, November 4, in the 
Wakefield Migh School. The following oflicers were elected: 

President, Lores McCloskey. 

Vice President, John Roach. 

Secretary, Joseph Sardella. 
The society is under the supervision of Mr. Fisher of the faculty and it has worked very enthusiasti- 
cally, belonging now to the Mystic Valley Boys' Debating League. The boys tested their mettle in a de- 
bate with the Girls' Debating Club, on Mav li^. in assemblw The ciueslion debated was "Resolved, that 
capital punishment should be abolished." However, that is all that can be said here, as we went to press 
before the debate took place. 

Girls' Debating Club 

The Girls' Debating Club of the \V. 11. S. v\as organized under the sponsorship of Miss Elizabeth 
Ingram, of the facull\, and under the supervision of Miss K. 01i\e Hirst, also of the facult}'. This is the 
first girls' debating club that has been formed in the W'.l 1. S. for several \ears. The officers elected are as lol- 
lows : 

President, Doris Duley. 

Vice President, Virginia Ulrici. 

Recording Secretary, Katherine Jakeman. 

(Corresponding Secretary, Pauline Peterson. 
A constitution was drawn up by the executive stalT and appro\'ed by the club members. The follow- 
ing questions have been debated with much enthusiasm during the \ear: That an amendment be added to 
the constitution giving Congress the power to limit, p;ohibit, and regulate the labor of persons under eigh.- 
teen ; That the Volstead Act be repealed; That immigration should he further restricted by law; That 
capital punishment be abolished in U. S.; That U. S. government should own and operate the railroads; 
That an income tax is a just and proper means of raising money for the government. 

The girls ha\c done their work without any coa:hing and are to be congratulated on the success of 
their ilebates. They tried their metal in a debate a gainst the boys in assembly on May 28. The club 
from a membership of fourteen chose three girls to represent them in this event. Dorothy Butler, Pauline 
Peterson, and Virginia Ulrici took the affirmative side of the question, Resolved: that capital punishment 
be abolished in U. S., against the negative upheld by Lores McCloskev, John Roach, and William Butler. 

The School Council 

What is the school council? It consists of a body of students, elected by the pupils, together with 
Mr. Peterson and three teachers appointed by him who act as advisors. 'Lhis year the advisors besides Mr. 
Peterson are Miss Dono\'an, Miss Gilmore, and Mr. Fisher. The students elected l(j represent the various 
classes are: Boit Brennon, Mildred Conohan, Wadswo;'th Allyn, Leonard Loughlin, Hope McCloskey, Daniel 
Robbins, Edythe Grant, Ruth Purdy, Helen Ramsdell, Arthur Newcomb, Robert Dutton, Clyde Tyler, James 
McTeague, Lillian Comee, Harold Decker, Carolyn Woodman, Muriel Emery, Ethel Batten, Maurice Ander- 
son, Doris Crabiel, George Perry, Eunice Smith, Barbara Hill, ;\lden Oocker, Aletha Whitney, Ruth Ober, 
Dorothy C. Butler, William Butler, and John Roach. 

.At the meetings of the council, problems, suggested by the members themselves or by the principal, 
are discussed. These problems pertain to matters relative to the conduct and welfare of the school. When 
the council decides upon a certain course of action, the movement is explained to the students of the school, 
usually by Mr. Peterson in assembly period. The school is asked to cooperate with the council in carrying 
out the project. It then becomes the business of each member of the council to see that the policy recom- 
mended is followed. If one of the members of the council asks a pupil to do anything necessary to the 
carrying out of the plan, he represents the principal an 4 expects to recei\'e the best of co-operation from the 
student. 

This body was formerly called the Student Council but recently the name has been changed to School 
Council which, it is thought, is a more comprehensive and exact title. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



The Charm School 

"The Charm School" was presented Friday evening, December 12, 1924, in the High School Audito- 
rium by the Senior Class. 

The cast included: 

Austin Bevans Ronald Sherman 

An automobile salesman with ideas, which 

David McKenzie Leonard Joll 

a law student, considers unpracticable, though 

George Boyd Rudolph Peterson 

an expert accountant is willing to co-operate 
and also 

Jim Simpkins Harry Tounge 

and 

Tim Simpkins - Louis Amiro 

Twins, who toil not and have ne\'er seriously considered doing so. 

Homer Johns Lores McCloskey 

is the guardian of 

Elise Bennett Emily Smith 

The president of a Senior Class at a school presided over by 
Miss Hays Christine Crabiel 

Who is loved and feared by all who know her, including her secretary 
Miss Curtis Catherine Sullivan 

Who is always trying to think well of the Senior Class, consisting of 

Sally Boyd Mae Maroney 

and 

Muriel Doughty Dorcas Woodbury 

Ethel Spelvin ; ■• Edith Dowling 

Alex A4ercier Celia Burwen 

Lillian Stafford , Irnia Foster 

Madge Kent Eunice Smith 

Charlotte Grey - .' Aletha Whitney 

Dotsie Dorothy Dinan 

Act I takes place in the boys' room of a New York house. Austin Bevans finds himself owner of Fair- 
view School, a boarding school for girls. Mr. Johns, his law\er, wants to relie\'e him, but Bevans will not 
change his mind as he has decided views on girls' education. 

In Act II .Mr. Bevans arrives at the school to take charge of it as profes.sor, and gives all his friends 
places as professors. Elise, niece of Johns, falls despjrately in lo\'e with him and believing her lo\e is re 
lused she runs away. Bevans decides to go after her. .Xftcr hours of anxious wailing, Idise is found and 
brought back by Bevans. 

In the last scene Austin tells Elise that she is sill\- anil aggravating but admits that she has "C~11.\RM". 

Ronald Sherman was quite convincing in his pa t; Lores Mc(>loskey, his lawyer, was also good as were 
Leonard Joll and Rudolph Peterson, while Harry Tounge and Louis .\miro took their parts with ease and 
caused the audience to be amused during the entire performance. 

Christine Oabiel was all her part was supposed to represent, with a dignity that was refreshing and 
natural, while (Catherine Sullivan, her secretary, fell hopelessly in lo\'e with e\cr\' male in sight in the most 
approved old maid style. 

The girls from Emily Smith down to Mae Maronex', were ju^l girls, happ\', >'oulhful. and mischiev- 
ous. 

While much credit is due the cast and all who assisted, luidoubtedly Miss Lillian Hurley, the coach, 
contributed most in time and effort to making the proLluclion the decided success it was. Those who had 
the opportunity of taking part acc|uired a splenditl training. 

The play was presented a second time, on January 9. 

The proceeds from the first performance netted !)}!2M3(), which is now in the class treasure From the 
second presentation !|!129.S5 was received. This has been turned over to Mr. Peterson who is planning to 
purchase a stereopticon for the school, which will be a gift from the Class of 1925. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



Music 

With the advantages of the new building, music, which is under the direction of Mr. Jones, has taken 
a most decided turn for the better. Undoubtedly, this year more has been done to promote this worth- 
while activity than in any previous year. 

The Girls' Glee Club now has fifty-nine members. This is the largest Glee Club we have had in the 
school for several years. Miss Gilmore is sponsor of the club. 

We also have a school orchestra which has twenty-three members and is doing splendid work. It fur- 
nishes music every week at our assembly period and recently played before the members of the Rotary Club. 
When the Senior class presented "The Charm School", the orchestra assisted. 

A concert was given by these youthful musicians and the Girls' Glee Club in the High School Audito- 
rium, May 15. This gave the public a splendid opportunit}' to note the progress that has been made in 
music during the past year at the Wakefield High School. 

^ ^^^» | « » ! ■ » ^ * ^ " i " ! * ^ ** t '' ' I ** ! * * I * ■ ^ •" X ** ! ** ! * • | «* ^ «» | »» | 8 • 1 * 

The Conmiercial Club 

The Commercial Club is a new organization in W. II. S. this year. It is composed primarily of stu- 
dents in the commercial course, although any pupil taking two or more commercial subjects is eligible to 
membership. 

Mr. Dower, head of the Commercial Department, is advisor of the club with all the commercial teach- 
ers as honorary members. 
The officers are: 

President Robert Salvati 

Vice-President Fred Rich 

Secretary Ruth Harnden 

Treasurer Thomas Mc Keon 

Reporter Thomas Walsh 

The president has appointed several committees, which are planning many events for the near future. 
The club is considering presenting a play in assembly. Flans are also under way for a social. 

The main purpose of the club, however, is to give the members a broader and more comprehensive 
knowledge of the commercial field. Mr. Dower intends to secure business men to speak at the meetings, to 
have demonstrators explain and demonstrate various office appliances, and to have exhibition of speed work 
in typewriting and shorthand, both by experts and pupils. 

Junior Prom 

Undoubtedly the Class of '26 staged the best Prom, on record, in the history of the new High School, 
in the school gymn on Friday, April 17. Everything bordered on the patriotic nature in honor of Patriots' 
Day and the gym decorated with innumerable fiags and banners was most attractive. 

Contrary to custom of recent years, (the grand march having been abolished at all the High School 
dances) President Walter Barry led off the grand march with Miss Edith Dowling, in vv'hich the lovely 
colors of gowns, mingled with dark suits, made a striking scene. At the close of the grand march, dance 
orders were given out by Miss Betty Ulrici, who made a charming miniature "Miss Liberty" in her costume 
of red, white and blue, and Robert Purdy dressed as Uncle Sam. 

The orchestra then began music for dancing which continued as usual until the fifth dance when 
again the music swung into march time and the couples received paper hats and favors. The favors, too, 
showed the original note which characterized the evening. The girls received delightful little paper parasols 
and colored shakers, and the boys, blowers. Then more surprise. Instead of the usual entertainment of 
speaking and solo dancing at intermission, the committee gave a burlesque on "Paul Revere's Ride". Luis 
Anderson made a splendid "Paul" and, when mounted on his worthy steed (consisting of Walter Barry and 
John Roach) stirred the imagination of the audience. Philip Potter made a very realistic moon which "rose 
o'er the bay", and Irving Melendy, as "Paul Revere's friend", climbed the "tower of the Old North Church", 
represented by a rickety stepladder, and held aloft the lanterns. The impersonation of "how the Redcoats 
gave them ball for ball" was very effective with rubber balls on elastic, and ended in a grand climax with 
the farmers routing them from the scene. Miss Ethel Batton read the poem as it was acted. The entire 
effect was very clever and showed the interest and earnest work of the committee. 



THE YEAR BOOR 



iJoUitg 




THE YEAR 



BOOK 




We hear that Dave Guarnaccia eats mayonnaise 
dressing every night so that he can get up "oily" in 
the morning. 



Ruth — "A little bird told me you were going to 
give me a diamond brooch lor my birthday." 
Jack — "It must have been a little cuckoo." ' 



"Doc" — "If a ship is 120 ft. long, 60 ft. wide, 
and has a capacity of 6000 tons, how old is her cap- 
tain?" 

Bill Feindel — "That's impossible, Mr. Preble. ' 

"Doc" — "Forty years old." 

Bill — "How do you figure that out?" 

"Doc"— "1 asked him." 

P. S. Hasty exit by Mr. Preble. 



Harry — "I just took a tough exam." 
"Gin" — "Finish?" 
Harry — "No, Spanish." 



The joke editors would like to know where four 
seniors got the sweet peas one day last term. 



North — "Hey. Jim, have you found the way to 
get downstairs?" 

Jim (from the bottom of elevator shaft) — "Yes, 
but look out for the first step." 



We wonder if Mr. Fisher takes a course in Jok- 
ology and Slamology. 



The joke editors would like lo know how K. 
Hunt found the "Wreck of the Hesperus." 



"Fat" Thresher — "1 can go out with any girl 1 
please." 

"Okie" O'Connell — "Well, \ou LJon't please ver\' 
many." 



1 lave )'ou noticed — 
"Bone" Randall's gait? 
"Finsy" Harper's bashfulness? 
"Tommie" Walsh's complexion? 
Doris Du ley's eyes? 
Emily Smith's literary ability. 
Harry Tounge's pink cheeks? 
Celia Burvven's marcel wave? 
Gus's efficient management? 
Myer's pompadour? 
"Keefe" North's bow tie? 
"Gin" Ulrici's cuteness? 
Irma Foster's dimples? 



The girl who is not good looking, but can dance 
like a million is like an Elgin movement in an In- 
gersoll case. 



K. Hunt — "1 had a good joke to tell you this 
e\'ening. but 1 see you're not in condition to receive 
it." 

Mina — "Why not?" 

K. — "Because if )'()ur face lights up the powder 
will go off." 

Our idea of the meanest man in the world is the 
warden who puts a tack in the electric chair. 



Slippy Magee — "Let's go to the movies." 
Spec (champion cross country man) — "Naw, 
it's three blocks and 1 haven't got my car." 



They tell us that Harry had to be sent home 
from Washington jiarcel post because he couldn't 
express himself. 



To be fresh is human — to be a Senior is divine. 



Mr. Fisher — "Who made the cotton gin?" 
Peterson — "Gee, 1 didn't know they- made it of 
that." 



E. R. — "The ancient Greeks often committed 
suicide." 

C. B. — "Tlicm was the da\-s, \-ou can <)nl\- tlo it 
once now." 



"Mutt" Finney — "Did you know that Rantlall 
is the champion marathon pugilist?" 

Doris — "No. How's that?" 

"Mutt" — "Yes. He boxed cantaloupes all sum- 
mer." 



now. 



lelen — "Tommie is a leading man in the movies 

Alice — "VOu ilon't sa\' so!" 
Helen — "Yes, an usher." 



THE YEAR BOOK 




McCLosKey C»n/i|\^ 



Ar THE JON/OP^ PROM 



AFTBRU&oH 
SLIBS 

I PrR DAY 

I- ^ f> 1 






THE YEAR 



BOOK 



Louise Davidson — "Whv did the rel'eree call that 
foul on Bill?" 

Marry — "For holding." 

Louise — "Isn't that just like Bill?" 

"Cnn" — "Say, that's a wonderful moon." 
ilarr\' — "Well, if you don't like this Buick you 
can set out and walk." 



.Mr. L'isher (in history class) — "Does the c]ues- 
tion embarrass you, Joll?" 

Joll — "Oh no, sir. The t]uestion is quite clear, 
it is the answer that troubles me." 



"Gus" — "That conductor is the cheekiest thing. 
1 le stared at me exactly as though 1 hadn't paid my 
fare." 

Doris — "And what did you do?" 

"Gus"--"1 stared back just as though I had." 

Harry — "1 have a cross-eyed girl for you." 

Fred — "Where?" 

1 larry — "In the eyes." 

Lady — "May 1 have the pleasure of your com- 
pany this evening, Major?" 

Finney — "Company, Madam? 1 command a 
battalion." 



Sardella — "Why the tooth-brush on your lapel? ' 
Pa" Saunders — "That's my class-pin. 1 was 
graduated from Colgate." 



llarper (after answering plxjne in Room 206) — 
"They've got the wrong number." 

( In French class) — "1 am indebted to you for all 
I know about French." 

Miss Goddard — "Pray, don't mention such a 
tride." 



Eaton — "I have a Ford; what car have you?" 

'Lounge — "A Buick." 

Eaton — "Well, that's a good car, too." 

KOYAl. SONS OU RHST 
President — "Bone" Randall. 
First Snoo/er — Francis Whitehead. 
Second Snoozer— Ralph Flannigan. 

Eaton (ha\'ing killed a lady's puppy while rid- 
ing in auto) — "Madame, 1 will replace the animal." 
Lad}/ — "Sir, you (latter yourself." 

Me who laughs last is usually the dumbest. 

.Mrs. llarper: Wake up, dear. 
"Bo/o": i can't. 
Mrs. M.: Why can't you? 
"Bozo": 'Clause I'm not asleep. 

TO KliEP YOU GUESSING: 

Why did the salt shaker? 

Because he saw the spoon holder. 

What turns without moving? Milk. 

What is a good thing to part with? A comb. 



Miller: Did the doctor remove your appendix? 
Amiro: Feels as if he removed my whole table 
of contents. 

Norma Perkins: Al, will you get my watch? It 
is upstairs. 

Al: Aw, wait awhile. It'll run down. 

Norma: No it won't. Ours is a winding stair- 
case. 

Fat: (to a slightly deaf farmer). Can you tell 
me where 1 can get some gas? 
Farmer: Mey? 
Fat: No, gas. This isn't a horse. 



Mickey: What makes your feet so wet? 
Celia: I've been wearing pumps. 



Mr. Fulton: Do you know Lincoln's Gettys- 
Arnold: 1 thought he lived in Washington. 



burg address 



ram. 



too. 



Eleanor: (conversational waitress) Looks like 
Mr. Fanck: (eating soup) \'es, it tastes like it, 



A boy who was late brought this excuse: "Please 
excuse Johnn>- for being late as he fell in the sewer 
B\- doing the same )()U will oblige me." 

Mr. Thibideau: I'm going to find a new board- 
ing house! This morning I couldn't find any soap, 
towels, or water to wash with. 

Landlad}': Vou'\e a tongue ha\en't >ou? 

Mr. T.: '\'es, but I'm no cat. 

.Mi5^ Ingram (in English class speaking of loco- 
moti\es) What's back of it all? 
Joll: The cars. 

Just imagine: 

O'Connell and Sweetser kissing each other. 

Crocker doing a fanc\- dance. 

McC>loske>' and Joll in a boxing match. 

Gilchrist entering the ministrw 

Tyler forgetting to bring his lunch. 

North v\itliout a comb. 

The bo}'s ha\ing tables to eat on. 

(x'lebrating .Miller's birthday b>' no school. 

Randall without a sweater. 

Salvati in bed at nine. 

Lishman with a girl. 

(Crosby singing, "Oh, it's nice to gel up in the 
morning." 

"Doc" Preble having his hair cut off. 

Mr. Peterson as a "g\m" instructor. 

"Ra\'" Dower smoking. 

"|oe" !)emis without ioiiine. 

Miss I UirlL'\- chewing gum. 

We have tried \er\' hani 
We think we'\e done our best 
We hope you like these jokes 
Belter than iMr. Fisher's test. 



THE YEAR BOOK 



MR O0IVE6 ^NP 
) The orchestra 




HOa^^i^ 




THE YVr\ RAW , 

RECROir 
At ATT E NT 10 IV 



[925- 




3AS£DAU-TEAn 




JOPG-E FISHER 



-v.ta- 



^t-t*- ^* 



SEN1,0R 



THE Y E A [I BOOK 



"plljint (uc arc olh mxh (tmni liiitl| years, luc'Il rcah 
®l|is rcrorii of our uoutl|, tl]c bau, tl]e place; 
J^nh (uc luill suit our memory to our uceb 
^nb long forgottcit uamc to inheh face." 



To Our Advertisers 

In behalf of the Senior Class of the Wakefield High School 
we wish to express our gratitude to those who so willingly gave 
us their advertisements. 

We were met by the advertisers very cordially and we 
feel proud to know that the Wakefield High School has many 
friends who help support its enterprises. 

(Signed) HARRY TOUNGE, Business Mgr. 
(Signed) BERTHA GERSINOVITCH, Asst. Mgr. 



Fifth Floor 
Take Elevators 



Specialists in 
Silk Fabric 



THRESHER BROTHERS 

"THE SPECIALTY SILK STORE" 

Established 23 Years 

19 TEMPLE PLACE Through to 41 West St. 

The Only "Natural Daylight" Silk Store in Boston 

Highest Quality— SILKS and VELVETS— 

Sell Here for Less Than Elsewhere 

NOT FOR ONE DAY OR ONE WEEK, BUT MONTH AFTER 

MONTH AND YEAR AFTER YEAR— 

Because we are "Specialists in Silks and Velvets" and the largest retail silk organization in the 
United States. We are located on the fifth tloor, thereby eliminating the exorljitant street-floor 
rents, and do not deliver, but each patron desiring goods sent pays for her own delivery. 
There are numerous other reasons why you can purchase silks at THRESHER BROS, made by 
the leading American and European manufacturers at a saving of 15 to 30%. 

Also SILK and LINGERIE BLOUSES, SILK HOSIERY, SILK PETTICOATS & SILK KNICKERS 



REMEMBER if it is "Silk" or "Velvet" you will find it at THRESHER'S, and usually at 
lower prices than the same quality can be procured elsewhere. That NONE EXCEL 
our assortments, however large in other lines. Samples given with pleasure. 



Philadelphia Store, 1320 Chestnut St. Cleveland Store, 1148 Euclid Ave. 

Baltimore Store, 17 W. Lexington St. 



The Hey wood -Wakefield Company 

Offers High School Graduates opportunities 
to Learn Various Trades 



AND 



Attractive Clerical Positions 



WATER STREET 



WAKEFIELD, MASS. 



In the Long Run 



you and your friends will prize the 
portrait that looks like you — your 
truest self, free from stage effects 
and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography 
that PURDY success has been won. 
Portraiture by the camera that one 
cannot laugh at or cry over in later 
years. 

For present pleasure and future 
pride protect your photographic self 
by having PURDY make the por- 
traits. 



.,je' 



"PURDY 

145 TREMONT STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

Official Photographer, Wakefield High School 
Classes of 1924-1925 



Compliments of 

Dr. John E. Drugan 



W. N. BRACKET! 

Shoe Repairer 
83-B Albion St. 



Frawley's Variety 
Store 

Cor. North Ave. & Church St. 
WAKEFIELD 




Sporting Goods That Will Add to Your Skill 

You will play a better game if you use Winchester Sporting 
Goods. They give you the confidence that wins. 

Whether it is baseball or football, hockey or skating, j^ou'll 
find our stock of Winchester products will supply your needs. 



J. Wallace Grace Co. 

14 ALBION STREET 



WAKEFIELD 



The Public Library 

and the 

High School Library 

arc among your best and most 

helpful friends. 

Keep up the Friendship 



YOUR SAVINGS BANK ACCOUNT 

is a friend who will never say — 
'I'm sorry, but I can't let you have it" 




Wakefield Savings Bank 

— The Only Savings Bank in Town — 



Wakefield Y. M. C. A. 

Clubs & Good Social Life 

for 

High School Fellows 



H. EBERT 

Successor to J. C. Walton 

Ice Cream, Tonic, Candy 

9G NORTH AVE. 



Compliments of 

Dr. Francis Maguire 



Compliments of the 

Railroad Market 

GEORGE W. REID 
Proprietor 


Drugs Chemicals 

BONNEY & DUTTON 

RIBEROT DUTTON, 
Prop. 

Soda Confectionery 


ERNEST E. PRESCOTT 

Real Estate — Insurance 

92 North Ave. 

0pp. Upper Station 

WAKEFIELD 


The Colonial Spa 

The store with home made 
ice cream and candies 

WAKEFIELD 


Pinto-Torrey Co. 

Shoes of Quality 

For the Whole Family 

Cor. Main & Albion Sts. 


G. W. BEASLEY 

Glassware, Kitchen Goods, 

Toys, Stationery, Confectionery 

Paints — Varnish 

439 Main Street, 

Wakefield 


Edward S. Hitchcock 

BICYCLES 
Bicycle & Auto Supplies 


Gowns Millinery 

INC. 

WAKEFIELD 

Corner Albion & Main Sts. 


MASON'S MARKET 

102 North Avenue, 
WAKEFIELD 


Compliments of 

ROPER'S 

SHOE STORE 

61 Albion st. 


Watch for our 
SPECIALS 

Grattaii's 

Something New Every Day 


Compliments of 

The Crystal Lunch 

445 Main St. 


Compliments of 

Palumbo's Fruit Store 

Italian Oil — Spaghetti 
ALBION ST. 


Greenwood Drugj 
Store 

S. A. Bussell, Prop. 

Brande Building 


Compliments of 

Chamoaqne Furniture 
Co. 

Albion Street 



REAL ESTATE 

Griffin and Magee 

TEL. CRYSTAL 0375 


INSURANCE 

125 ALBION ST. 


Edward E. Lee & Co. 

Groceries & Provisions 

Greenwood, Mass. 


Cash & Carry Market 

lll-A Albion Street 


Compliments of 

Dr. F. T. Woodbury 


Bellevue Shop 

French Millinery 
109 Albion street 


For the Best 

Footwear & Gents' 

Furnishings 

Go to the 

Elite Quality Shop 

442 Main Street, 
Corner Meclianic St. 


Compliments of 

tie MAltJ 57, VVAHEFfEL^ MASS ^^^ 

438 Main Street, 
WAKEFIELD 


The American Fruit Store 

John E. Burke 

410 Main St., 
Wakefield 


Complimenls of 

Barrett's Barber Shop 

Walvelield 


Compliments of 

Dr. Elwin H. Wells 


Compliments of 

I. MILLER 

TAILOR 
101 North Ave. 


Harley-Davidson Bicycles 








CHAS. MARTIN 

Albion Street 
Accessories — Repairing 


Hardware 
Sporting 

Goods 

Kitchen 

Ware 


Holland Hardware Store 

84 North Ave. — Tel. Crys. 1141-M 

The store of quality plus service 


Paints 

Varnish 

Window 

(Uass 

Putty 











Compliments of 

JOHN G. REID 



PROVISIONS 



Compliments of 

Bowser & Co. 



Thomas F. Jeiiiiiiis;s 

Insurance Broker 

94-A Albion St. 



Compliments of 

Sperber's Public Market 

14-14-A Water St. 



Compliments of 

ORDE'S FISH 
MARKET 

109-A Albion St. 



Miscellaneous 
Trucking — Jobbing 

A. DeCecca 

Call 
Crys. 387-J-K Res. 444-W 



CONTINUOUS INSTITUTIONS 

Item Press 

GOOD PRINTERS FOR OVER HALF A CENTURY 

Wakefield Daily Item 

WAKEFIELD'S LOCAL NEWSPAPER 



ITEM BUILDING 



Crystal 0080 



C. F. Hartshorne 
& Son 

General Insurance 
Agents 

MAIN STREET 



Get Your Uniforms & Chevrons 
at 

Rosenfield & Rapkin 

15 SCHOOL ST., BOSTON 
Lowest Prices in Boston 



Compliments of 

Dr. P. L. McAuliffe 



Hudson Essex 

WAKEFIELD GARAGE 

H. A. Knowlton 
518 Main St. Crys. 0270 



— 14 Stores — 

Adams Company 

Women's & Children's 
Furnishings 

WAKEFIELD 



Weld's Ice Cream 

"The Best by Test" 
WAKEFIELD 



I 



Taylor's Hardware Store 

THE SPORTING GOODS STORE 

Sole Agent for the Draper-Maynard Line 

This line is used by 90 percent of the big league clubs. 

BATS, BASEBALLS, GLOVES, MASKS, ETC. 

GOLF BALLS, TENNIS BALLS & RACKETS 
For the Fisherman 

Fishing Tackle, Steel Rods, Bamboo Rods, 
16 and 18 ft. 



Our Line is a Real Sportsman's Line 

George H. Taylor Company 

MAIN STREET— TEL. CRYSTAL 0018 





Office 






Yard 






UPSON BOARD 


& CEMENT 


Compliments of 




REX ASPHALT 


SHINGLES 


Dr. J. William O'Connell 


A. T. Locke 

Wholesale — LUMBER — Retail 






SHEETROCK 




Albion Street, Near 


Upper Station 


"Say It With Flowers" 








Alice B. Vassion 


Flowers for Every Occasion 

A. S. Parker 


City Hall Cc 

6 Water St. 


ash Market 

Crys. 0566-M 




Dressmaking, Cleansing, 
Pressing, Dyeing 


FLORIST 








73 Albion St. 


A GOOD PLACE TO TRADE 








You be the Judge 








Clifford Black Co., Inc. 

HOME FURNISHERS 






Compliments of 

EDEN K. BOWSER 


WAKEFIELD 








Corner Main t 


fc Avon Streets 









FRESH CANDIES OF HIGH QUALITY 

Kodak Supplies, Developing & Printing 

Greeting Cards, Chocolates 

Boyd's Ice Cream 



L. L. McMaster 

426 MAIN STREET 



Compliments of 

McCarthy's Market 

Charles M. McCarthy 
Proprietor 



"Quality Dry Goods" 

Paiiie's 

464 Main St. 



Home Cooking Pure Food 

Delicious Coffee 

ROYAL LUNCH 

490 Main Street 



Compliments of 

Clarence A. Gould 

Funeral Director 



Compliments of 

DeCecca's Bakery 

Headquarters for 

Friend Bros.' Food Products 

430 Main St. Crys. 0236 



McGunigle & Tounge 

Engineers — Contractors 
BOSTON 



Compliments of 

Winsor L. Finney 

GROCER 

22 Salem St. 



Compliments of 

Lucas Bros. 

Waterman's Fountain Pens 
406 MAIN ST. 



Compliments of 

Dr. W. H. Corcoran 



A. C. VERGE 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Theatre Building 

Main Street 



W. E. KNOX 

Lumber, Lime, Cement 
Reynold's Shingles 

593 Main St. 
Wakefield Junction 



Compliments of 

The 

Wakefield & Princess 

Theatres 



Dr. Will. D. Hunt 

OPTOMETRIST 

Glasses (including examination) $5 up 
GO ALBION ST. 



Compliments of 

The Wakefield H. S. 
Athletic Association 



Wakefield 

Fire 
Department 



S. R. Pinto Shoe Co. 

Shoes for the Entire Family 

Postoffice Building 
WAKEFIELD 



A Friend 



Compliments of 

Co-operative Bank 

WAKEFIELD 



Wakefield Fish Market 

J. H. Hillsgrove 
3 Mechanic St. 



Compliments of 

J. T. Tredinniek 

Tailor 

10 Albion St. 



Compliments of 

W. H. BUTLER 



Compliments of 

DR. V. A. ROACH 




•That Good Milk" 



SPERO BROS- 

Furniture 

11-13 Albion St. 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 

for 

Golf — Tennis — Baseballs — Gymnasiums — Etc. 

Bathing Suits — Sweaters 

Catalog free on request 



James W. Briiie Co. 

286 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Ye Barnard Inn 



Compliments of 




THE MIDDLESEX KNITTING 
COMPANY 



SAND 



GRAVEL 



Henry A. Feindel 



LUMBER, LIME, CEMENT, PLASTER, BRICK, 
FIRE CLAY, PIPE 

Yard WAKEFIELD JUNCTION Tel. Crys. 0388 



Compliments of 

Nagle's Drug Store 

Wakefield 



Athletic Shirts Running Pants 

SMALL'S 

ON THE SQUARE 
Gym Shoes Sneakers 



Charles F. Keyes 

ml 

Paint — Wallpaper 
Interior Decorating 

84 Albion St. 



Dr. T. F. Parks 



Compliments of 

Dr. E. J. Donovan 

462 Main St. 
WAKEFIELD 



Compliments of 

William C. Strong 

9 Nahant St. 



Boothby's 

Specialty 

Shop 

434 Main St. 



A. H. Colson 
Manager and Treasurer 



16 & 17 Blackstone Market, 

76 Blackstone St. 

Boston 



F. L. Maynard Co. 

BEEF, LAMB, VEAL and POULTRY 

Jol)l)ing and Family Trade 

Also 

Schools, Camps, Clubs, Dining Halls 

Tel. Richmond 1243—1244 



Cleansing, Dyeing, Laundering 



Send tt 




ivihe , 
'd[^unanf 



The Wakefield Laundry 

Ernest G. Willard 
3-13 Lincoln St. Crys. 0116-0117 



Compliments of 

GOWING'S MARKET 



MAIN ST. 



Wakefield's Wet Wash 




Compliments of 


SPEEDY SERVICE 
QUALITY WORK 

We wash everything 


/^^\ 


Barnett Gersinovitch 

Dealer in 

Cattle, Beef, Veal, Poultry 

Tel. Crystal 0390 


Crescent Laundry 


A. L. A. 






Jokers' Novelties, Gifts 

and 

Everything Musical 

IDEAL SONG SHOP 

Cor. Main & Water Sis. 


Official Headlight Focusing 
Station 

Barry's Garage 


FRED LOGSDON 

REAL ESTATE 

117 Albion — Crys. 1230 



Coinpliments of 



L. B. Evans' Son Company 



CURLEY BROS. 

CLEAN COAL 
Prompt Delivery 

Boston Prices 



Paper Towels 

Paper Picnic Plates 

Paper Spoons & Forks 

Paper Drinking Cups 

Stone & Forsyth Co. 

67 Kingston St. Boston 



Holeproof Hosiery 

Sold only at 

Connellv's 

People's Clothing Store 
Wakefield 




b^ 






Nubone, Lingerie & Stockings 

Mrs. A. C. Braxton 

137 Main St. 



Compliments of 

DR. R. P. CASSIDY 



Compliments of 

Jack Beebe, Jr 




Webster=TIhioinnias Company 



219 STATE STREET 
BOSTON 



Compliments of 



THOMAS HICKEY 



the 



"Coal Man" 



Frank Irving Cooper Corporation 

ARCHITECTS ENGINEERS 

172 Tremont Street, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Beach 0727 
ARCHITECTS OF NEW WAKEFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



Point Setter Brand Food Products 



WAKEFIELD 

POLICE 
DEPARTMENT 



J. S. Round & Company 



— JEWELERS — 



734 WASHINGTON STREET 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Telephone Beach 3674 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Harry Tounge 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Bertha Gersinovitch 



\ 



The Walton Shoe 


For Boys and Girls 


i? 


A. G. WALTON & CO. 


BOSTON 






Protect Your Valuables 



in our 



Modem Burglar Proof Vault 



Boxes from ^5 to ^40 per year 




W, 



T 



G 



AKEFIELD i RUST V^OMPANY 
WAKEFIELD, MASS.